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Great Options for Guys at the Hand-Made Village

Great Options for Guys at the Hand-Made Village

You know that moment when the T-shirt you promised you’d wear the whole weekend of Folk Fest becomes just too sweaty to bear? Or when your trusty ball cap falls off while dancing to a rad new band, and is trampled by excited feet? Or maybe you’re just looking for some retail therapy after a high-energy day of music and good vibes. Whatever the scenario, the Hand-Made Village this year features a great variety of vendors for those shopping for men’s or unisex clothing.

For all your silk-screened T-shirt needs, Calgary-based artist Heather Reinhardt has your back. Reinhardt’s one-woman company, Mumbletease, travels across Canada sharing her unique designs. At first glance, her shirts look like a silk-screened fairy tale: monsters, floating animal skulls and dancing trees have all made appearances on her apparel. Most of her designs come from stream-of-consciousness ideas that she sketches on the page, before screen-printing the shirts in her parent’s basement. Last time Reinhardt was at Folk Fest, her “sad seven-armed Octopus” T-shirt was a favourite among my friends.

Rather than silk-screening their T-shirts, Jesse and Andy Druxerman, a husband and wife duo from Fernie, British Columbia, have designed perfect bleached clothes to go with your sun-bleached hair. And What Apparel is dedicated to creating original hand-bleached T-shirts, sweatshirts and hats. The Druxermans like to think of their creations as “wearable art,” which manifests itself in wild designs, from splattered starry night skies to glowing pineapples. You’ve really got to see it to believe it.

There must be something in the water in southern BC, because Brenda Avis and Mitch Christofferson are bringing their trucker hats, snapbacks, and five panels all the way from Nelson. Cutthreads’ eye-catching designs are anchored on the hats’ fabric, which is hand-woven by Avis in a home studio. You know the term “sun-safe?” These hats will keep your tender cheeks from burning to a crisp, keeping you stylish and safe. Their mountain and tree designs harken to their BC home, while other hats feature muted stripes and patterns that had us thinking about a prairie summer.

For more funky hats, perennial Hand-Made Village favourite Oldhat is back with stylish and ethical hats made by local boy Nathan Dueck. All of Dueck’s hats are hand-sewed and made from recycled or second-hand fabric, which he carefully selects after scouring selections of old pants, curtains and other fabrics. Oldhat is a national business – his hats impress across the country – but he’ll be coming home in July to set-up shop again at this year’s Winnipeg Folk Fest. Because they are made from reused fabric, each hat has a different design and is made with care.

For Folk Fest-goers looking to buy men’s or unisex clothing, the Hand-Made Village this year has a plethora of fun options. From silk-screened and bleached shirts to hand-woven hats, these vendors are a great opportunity to enhance your summer style. For a full list of Hand-Made Village vendors click here.

Tags

folk fest, hand-made village, handmade, winnipeg folk festival

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2015 Hand-Made Village Vendors

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Here they are: the incredible artisans you’ll find at the 2015 Winnipeg Folk Fest! Click the vendor name and additional social media links below to get a sneak peek at their wares online and start dreaming about the pieces you’ll pick up at the festival.

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Take a piece of Folk Fest home with you, whether it’s a record by your new favourite artist, a Folk Fest T-shirt or a hand-made treasure.

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2017 Winnipeg Folk Fest tickets will go on sale in November!